Flip Flop House: Concrete-ing & Other Essentials

On the site last week, there was the addition of a few details, and some poured concrete.

Here, we are looking up into the elevator shaft.  The top of the shaft is above the roof.  This shows what an area drain looks like from below (to see what it looks like from above, check out this earlier post).  The ceiling is sloped toward the area drain, and the pipes will carry the water off of the roof.

Another drainage issue is located at the sliding doors that lead out to the decks.  Water can accumulate in the tracks of the doors, so we have added a drain pipe in the framing for the tracks:

We are working with the guys on site to coordinate how the finishes will align where the stairs meet the floor.  We want the terrazzo to flow smoothly, and flawlessly, over the floor and the stairs.

Now back to our old buddy, concrete!

This guy is using a machine to compact the ground so that the concrete will have a smooth base to be poured onto:

Leveling the concrete with some very advanced techniques…

Here is still wet concrete, smoothed out.  For the exterior concrete floors, acid is poured on top, which removes the top most layer of concrete.  This leaves it with a texture similar to sandpaper so that when it gets wet, you won’t slip!

The interior floors get a smooth “trowel” finish.  A trowel is that tool he is using to smooth out the concrete.  This concrete floor will be super smooth and beautiful.

Some of the exterior stairs have a recessed light detail that calls for some extra “steps” (ha…ha).  The goal is to have the stairs look as though they are floating above one another, with light coming out from the underside.  Confused?  Here, allow some images to help:

This is the framing for the stairs.  The foam remains while the concrete is poured.  After the concrete dries, they remove the foam, and a void is left (for the lighting).

Here are the same stairs, with concrete.  They are in the process of removing the foam.

Ta da!  We will fit strips of LED lights inside the recessed areas, and at night, you’ll see a sleek glow (they will come back with a concrete saw to make the voids completely straight).