Tag Archives: beams

Flip Flop House: Wood Framing Begins!

The wood framers have moved in.  We are doing things a bit asynchronous in order to keep up our tight schedule.  Staying on track, the framers will construct the deck of the 1st floor to start.  This will allow other crews / trades to work below safely.  You can see that the framers have built themselves a floating cat walk to ease their work.

The first step is to attach the beams at the rim of the structure.  At each steel beam, there are steel studs (Nelson Studs, nothing to do with Nelson’s Column).  The lumber is mounted to these studs, and field measuring is done at each unique location.  It takes roughly 30 minutes to complete each beam.

Below, the wood beam is attached to the steel structure.  You can see that now the Nelson studs have bolts and washers at their ends.  The wood has also been prepared in such a way so that the bolts are countersunk into the wood.  Check out Countersinking for more information.  As a whole, we prefer this method of mounting, however, there is added labor.

Above each steel beam, there is also a piece of lumber.  This is called a plate.  The plate is used as a means to interface the other miscellaneous framing and decking.

Flip Flop House: Steel, Steel, & More Steel

Well – the majority of the steel framing is up!  Its amazing to finally see the skeleton of the Flip Flop House!

We have both stair cases in place now:

Until the welding of the steel connections is complete, cables and “struts” hold it into place.

The struts hold it up with compression, and the cables use tension:

It will take about 2-3 weeks to finish the welding completely.

Next step – wood decking!

Stairs From the Bottom

Flip Flop House: Stairs!…and Rain

October in Los Angeles usually brings sun, bright blue skies, and mid 70° temperatures….but, not yesterday.  Yesterday was cold (yes, 55° is cold when you live in a desert-ish climate!), rainy and quite gloomy.  The guys on site left early because of the weather…..but not before they put up some more steel and stairs!!

The first flight of stairs!  I can’t even count the hours we spent designing these to make sure they fit juuuuust right:

Here is the view from (what will be) the first floor:

Even on a gloomy day, the beach and ocean is still a beautiful scene to have right outside your home!

Flip Flop House: Steel & The Return of Concrete

Today on site, we are doing both steel and concrete!

We finished up the concrete footings (which transmit the concentrated loads of the structure to the ground) for the house and the site walls:

Haven’t you ever wanted to see concrete being poured??

We are also moving right along with the steel:

Here, they are in the process of putting up another beam:

Tomorrow…STAIRS!

Steel Framing

Flip Flop House: Drumroll please……STEEL!

Yesterday (Monday, October 3, 2010 to be exact) was another really exciting day – they began putting the steel framing up!!  (I know, I know – sounds more exciting than a day of no traffic in LA, right?!)

A couple weeks ago, we checked out the steel at the shop where it was fabricated.  In that post, we show the massive quantity of steel that we are using to build this house, and we explain why we chose to use so much metal.

It is very exciting for us because the steel reveals the true shape of the house, and provides the skeleton structure for the other trades to commence their work.  It also signifies that we are moving past the site work (foundation, perimeter walls, etc) – and we can actually start working on the body of the Flip Flop House!

With the framing in place, we are beginning to see the interior spaces in their actual size, and their relationship to the exterior.

The guys started assembling steel around 9:00 am, and by 11:00 am – they had all of this up!

By Friday, all of the steel should be up (which would mean that it took these skilled men one week to assemble it).  Then, they will spend another 2 weeks welding all of the connections, while an inspector makes sure that all the welds are according to code.  All in all, it is a remarkably quick process, considering how much they are getting done!

To show how fast all of the steel comes together, check out the video below.  In just 6 minutes, a beam goes from laying on the ground, to being 10 feet in the air and attached to the other steel members!